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for three months. but this was a real dp perexper a jufrpg food binge in the name of science y some people get diabetes or hypertension when they gain and some don't. here is john donvan. >> two sausage buttery burr ti- >> a number three. >> he goes to the drive-thru. again and again. and again. >> thank you very much. >> and why? for science. dave giocolo is a guinea pig of sorts. back up a few months, put dave in his car and here was the heaad he heard. >> this study includes a short term high coalorie diet and the diet program. >> reporter: offering to pay people to add fat to their own bodies, adding an extra meal each day, 1,000 calories worth of fast food and a lot of people came forward. like dave. a salesman. >> once i got into work i called right away and i tried to e-mail them. >> reporter: for what? research. >> you can see this is x-ray slice through the abdomen where you can see the thick rim of fat around the outside. >> reporter: the doctor wanted to find out why only some people who gain weight also get diabetes and hypertension and others do not something he could not res
. >> if i had to pick someone to win and become a spokesperson for what is best about science and biomedical science it would be him. >> reporter: i asked the doctor how he is going to celebrate. he said he's probably going to have a beer. the love for medicine runs in his family, his wife is a dermatologist and their two doctors are both in medical school. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> much more still ahead. developing news in a meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated medicine, the rise in the number of cases. >>> battle between wedding caught on video. the wild fight that ended with the death of one man. >>> federal health officials say the number of confirmed meningitis cases from contaminated steroid shots has risen to 105, death toll from 7 to 8. the drugs were sent to four clinics here in california. t.j. winick reports the drugs are being recalled. >> reporter: the pharmacy the at the center of the meningitis out brach has announced voluntary recall of every product -- it makes saying this action is being taken out of abundance of caution. one of those sickened was janet russell o
. >> there is science now we didn't have before. that sexual orientation is not something that can be changed. >> but the victory may be short lived and there are groups that already claim it's unconstitutional violating first amendment. >> this is absolutely clamps down on speech by professionals involved and also affects the minors and their parents rights to access types of therapies they may want. >> legal groups also argue conversion therapy does work for people. >> when this benefits people, and may or may not benefit other people there is no basis for the state to step in. >> this is among the darkest times of my life? >> did it work? >> no. i am just as gay as i ever was. >> other states will be interested in seeing how this case plays out. they, too are considering the ban autos there is a busy weekend ahead. there a look at options this weekend. >> and there is a killer whale in sea world with a injury what. trainers say could have caused this massive wound. >> and this is the rover seeing unusually have you heard of the new dialing procedure for the 408 and 669 area codes? no, what
request for an interview. >> up next remarkable science behind creating a human heart. >> and there i >>> findings of a study out of uc berkeley are raising concerns about the chemical known as bpa showing mothers with high levels had less active thoi roids and the thyroids of newborn boys were more active. there is no impact found among newborn girls and this is commonly found in other containers and in the lining of food and beverage can autos people understand how easy to break a heart but how about making one? there is a group of researchers developed a blueprint they say could have a profound affect. >> through a microscope there is no mistaking beating. these heart cells were created in a bay area lab and have helped researchers unlock secrets of how a heart becomes a heart it helps to know what switches exist how they're connected and what they turn on or shut off. >> so this team set out to map the genetic switches locked inside of the dna of embryonic stem cells to see how it becomes a hearts cell. >> this is setting right switches to turn genes on or off. >> to begin, the re
the arms come apart. >> reporter: watch her hands. >> yep. baby just flies out. >> reporter: the science of destruction. a picture perfect crash, a wrecked jetliner and a treasure trove of new information about what it takes to survive the unthinkable. i'm neal corps skarlinsky for "nightline" in detroit. >> "curiosity: plane crash" airs sunday on the discovery channel. >>> she's known for her love songs like "you belong with me," come backstage with us at "glamour" cover shoot with the one and only taylor swift. [ female announcer ] e-trade was founded on the simple belief that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. because it helps you keep doing what you love. no wonder it's a
will share the award with haroche of france. the rile academy of sciences says they opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics. >>> a look at the weather and see where that rain is out there. >> depends on where you are it could be anywhere with it being closest to the coast that would be a better area to see scattered light showers during morning hours. let's look at what is going on the embarcadero san francisco back to the bay bridge looks quiet. live doppler 7 hd, this is what it looks like right now and let me flatten this out a little, as i do, you will be able to see how close it is to the coast. about 17 mile there is as we head toward -- 15 to 17 miles -- we'll put it into motion, it is dissipating as it heads north, the chunk of low pressure starting to move more towards northwest which means good sign that most of this activity is going to stay well out over the ocean. don't be surprised if a spray sprinkle or two gets along the sonoma marin county coast this morning. we are running in the 40s napa, santa rosa everybody else in the 50s. thick fog north bay valleys. mo
could have a profound affect on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the b
on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watch
of economic data which are all science faction, but these are honestly constructed science fiction. >> most people don't understand, you do, obviously, but how this is done. this is a survey of 60,000 households. george, eighth a survey. it last a margin of error. >> about 400,000 jobs it could be. >> the margin is 0.2%. you could have 8% unemployment. >> the survey of employers and households and they're telling the same story of an economy that is slowly on the mend, slowly but slowly on end. >> it's a belly crawl. it's a belly crawl. you like to talk about your data, professor. here's political data. 80% or three-quarters of seniors, women, men and independents think that the obama policies did not help either their personal situation or the economy. majorities of women, men, independents and seniors and small business believe that the obama policies have hurt the economy. this is about policies. it is -- you want me to read your data. i'm saying read our data. >> the reality -- the point is that in boasting about the unemployment number, you know, the obama people are making too much ou
-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. >> can i get two sausage burritos? can i get a number four? >> reporter: over and over and over again. it's been dave giocolo's life the past three months or so. as has been eating the food. a precisely measured 1,000 calories a day -- an extra meal daily -- fast food only. how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? because this man is paying him to. dr. samuel klein is a researcher at washington university medical school in st. louis, trying to understand why weight gain leads to diabetes and hypertension. and how that relates to levels of fat in the liver and muscles. at some point, research on rats alone just isn't enough. somebody has to eat this food this way to -- >> ultimately, it has to come to people. >> reporter: and a radio ad -- >> attention overweight volunteers -- >> reporter: -- that offered a cash incentive, up to $3,500. depending on how long it would take. >> once i got into work, i called them right away. >> reporter: so did nurse dawn freeman. >> it probably took a month to just get -- >> reporter: to get approved, to g
signed the bill and said, quote, these have no basis in science or medicine. they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery. >> an oakland man is one of 23 winners so called genius grants and is a family independence initiative after a challenge from mayor jerry brown taking a different approach to help poor families instead of giving aid it helps them figure out their own paths towards self sufficient. >> we're looking at character loans so that if you don't meet other criteria, there are other criteria you can access low interest loan autos the family independence initiative helped about 800 families and he plans to use a portion of the $500,000 money to expand the program to other country autos coming up next, there is a big new layoff announcement from silicon valley. hundreds of people about to lose their job autos stage is set tonight for first presidential debate. and voting against underway. >> there is a progress report on the new bay bridge. the lock is run to opening day. stay with us. >>> good evening, there is a packed house tonight. emotions are really on edge. abc
: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos? can i get two sausage burritos? can i get a number four? >> reporter: over and over and over again, it has been dave giocolo's life the past three months or so. as has been eating the food. a precisely measured 1,000 calories a day. a fast food daily only. how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein is a researcher at washington university in st. louis. trying to understand why fast food leads to weight gain and diseases like diabetes and hypertension. at some point, though, research on rats alone is not enough. somebody has to eat the food? >> ultimately, it has to come to people. >> reporter: and so, a radio ad, that offered a cash incentive, up to $3,500, depending on how long it would take. >> once i got into work, i called right away. >> reporter: so did nurse, dawn freeman. >> it probably took a month, to just get -- >> reporter: to get approved? >> to get approved. >> reporter: so, they ate every day, from one of these five restaurants, until their weight went up
math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that the corporate tax rate is too high. so, i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states. on energy, governor romney and i agree we've got to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy source of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible, now, in order for us to do it, we do have the close our deficit and i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight how do we deal with our tax code and how do we make sure that we a
for his work. and this could change the course of science, seems less likely to change this researcher. >> and i'm a basic scientist. >> i will predict when he wins a nobel prize it will not change him one iota. >> and the mad dash to grab a good deal on black friday may be a waste of time. there are shopper that's do not get lowest prices on friday after thanksgiving. prices for many gifts are qlor at other times. and retailers select just a few items to dur us n walmart teeming fourp a card that is called blue bird and saying it will allow users to avoid increases fees and ause -- allows users to send money through a smart phone app. and there are google could be getting into the credit card business. >> which companies might be spying on us. >>? there is a house intelligence committee calling two tech companies a national security threat n a report throat that wallway and zp have links to china's government and goes on to say they can be using technology to spy on the united states and recommends the u.s. government block mergers involving those companies and warns contractors and b
thing. that would point to anger and aggression. thank goodness we have science to teach us these. >> that's "pop news." >> listen, i always say to you, george, i'm here for you. >> thank you very much. sam, we're so glad you're here for us this morning. >> good morning, gang. hey, take a look at this columbus day crowd in times square. we are going all the way down to 45th street, basically, we've got such a long line here. good morning, everybody. >> good morning. >> thank you. tell me your name. it's your birthday? >> dawn. >> dawn, where are you from? >> albuquerque, new mexico. >> happy birthday. thanks for spending it with us. good morning, everybody. it's pierogi day? today's pierogi day? let's get to the happy pierogi day. we're going to start with the rain on the eastern seaboard. now, it is more south earlier in the day. by nighttime the rain is in d.c. and continues up the coastline. and most of the nation is dry. all that warm air in the west, though, is going to get a knockdown so look at l.a., 77 today, 67 on wednesday. a big change in san diego as well. even in ph >
by thirty years of science. try centrum® silver. visit centrum-dot-com for your three dollar coupon. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo hoo! [ male announcer ] iams. with 50% more animal protein. [ dog 2 ] i'm an iams dog for life. not a rabbit. woof! [ dog 2 ] i'm an iams dog for life. stop by walmart this saturday. wireless. take a one-minute demo of our new lg optimus zip. for every demo we'll donate one dollar to make-a-wish. up to one million dollars. visit one-minute-one-million-dot-com to find a participating walmart near you. they're whole grain good... and yummy good. real fruit pieces. 12 grams of whole grains and a creamy yogurt flavored coating. quaker yogurt granola bars. treat yourself good. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i
puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulne
i've ever seen in my life. >> reporter: the science of destruction, a picture-perfect crash, a wrecked jetliner and a treasure trove of new information about what it takes to survive the unthinkable. for "good morning america," neal karlinsky, abc news, detroit. >> so don't sit in first class. >> yeah. >> and don't hold your baby in your lap. >> and buy an extra seat for that child. yeah. >> fascinating report. our thanks to neal karlinsky and "curiosity plane crash" airs on the discovery channel tonight. >>> coming up here on "good morning america," open wide, the innovative solution one family found for the baby who just would not eat. ♪ gangnam style [ male announcer ] at walgreens, we know kids share all kinds of things, especially germs. that's why you always get your flu shot. this year, walgreens will do you one better, and check if there are any other immunizations you might need -- absolutely free, no appointment necessary. preparing you for years of unplanned sharing to come. at walgreens and take care clinics, we've got all kinds of ways to arm yourself for flu
the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulnerable to contract
good. >> "argo" science fantasy adventure. it's a turnaround. >> do we get the option? >> are you worried about the ayatollah? try the wga. >> when you have more than a hundred million people saying it's the best movie they've seen in years, you start thinking maybe it's going to be director. >> who's your director? >> can you teach someone to be a director? >> it's great movie to watch with an audience. the reactions that you get, the communal feelings, it's just terrific. >> i haven't felt this proud or excited since "good hunting." when i made "good hunting," i had no idea what i was talking about. >> all-star cast. look at that. >> it's going to come out this weekend. i look forward to seeing that. it's nice to see the passion, you know, when somebody's involved that deeply, directing in it and acting in it. >> he's invested. >> he's very invested. >> it's a long way since "armageddon." do you remember that? >> oh, yeah. >> all right. that's the news for this half hour. remember to follow us on facebook at wwnfans.com. >> because we don't want to miss a thing, channeling "arma
in the name of science. i should actually enlist in that focus group. >> we could be millionaires. great -- all the food on this show. >> we would be large -- living literally. >>> first, the manhunt along the u.s./mexico border. president obama has called the family of 30-year-old border patrol agent nicholas ivy who was killed early yesterday. >> mr. obama promised that ivy's family that those responsible will be found. abc's cecilia vega reports from southern, arizona. >> reporter: it is remote, dangerous, and deadly, and it was here on this dusty stretch of land where arizona meets mexico that three border patrol agents were fired on. one made it out safely. another was shot twice and expected to recover. but the third agent, 30-year-old nicholas ivy, was shot dead. >> we suspect that this is probably some type of narcotics trafficking event. that these agents encountered. but at this time, that would be speculative. >> reporter: the three agents headed to a spot just three miles north of the border. as they headed up a desert hill, someone fired right at them in what is being descri
. the delivery system puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with - every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condemns. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more v
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)